Vintage Non-Sports Cards
Buy/Sell/Trade Vintage Baseball Links Gallery of Non-Sports Cards
Vintage Non-sports Forum
Sign up Calendar Latest Topics
 
 
 


Reply
  Author   Comment  
insidethewrapper

Member
Registered:
Posts: 20
Reply with quote  #1 
I was wondering what year does " Modern" start in the "Non- Sports " Community now that we are in 2020 ?  Sports is usually " Pre and Post War" . Modern is never agreed on as the years go by , some say Pre-1975 others go up to 1980 , with 1981 being Modern. I personally feel about 1981 would be considered Modern at the present time ( even though that is 40 years ago ). Is their a Modern - late 20th Century and 21st Century  ? Is their a hobby consenus ?
swarmee

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 228
Reply with quote  #2 
1980 is pretty much still the concensus. Some people argue for 1989 because that's when Upper Deck started, adding a hologram to every card and forcing Topps to upgrade from gray stock sets.  Upper Deck also spawned the modern arms race that led to Leaf, Flair, Finest/Refractors, and parallel sets that some love and some hate.  I'm still a 1980 guy when it comes to this question though, mainly because the vast overproduction of the 80s has rendered the vast majority of baseball cards from the decade worthless.  And since vintage normally denotes "carries some value based on its age", I can't put the 1980s in that bucket. 
__________________

PSA: "Sometimes Get Cheated"
https://www.comc.com/Users/mjohnatgt,sr,i100 

MorrellMan

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #3 
Interesting.  Many years ago the NS chronology was broken up at 1960 - basically post ACC.  I wouldn't necessarily consider all 1960s cards as modern, but I can't believe a set of "Kung Fu" cards would be anything but modern.
__________________
Mark Hellman
lcummins

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 303
Reply with quote  #4 
I personally define Modern as starting after the Wax Pack era ended about 1992... the last 30 years or so.

I was thinking about a similar thought just the other day. If you broke up non-sports “bubble gum cards” into “ages”, similar to comic books, what would the ages be? My thought...

The Golden Age - 1930’s to 1955
The Silver Age - 1956 to 1975
The Bronze Age - 1976 to 1992
The Modern Age - 1993 to present

Any thoughts?

__________________
Lonnie Cummins
wdmullins

Member
Registered:
Posts: 53
Reply with quote  #5 
The Donruss 1977 All-Pro Skateboard set is the first NS card set I remember buying from packs.  Ergo, everything before that is vintage, and everything after is modern.  QED.

(I know I bought Wackies and Odd Rods before that; I found a notebook in my parent's attic with those stickers on them.  But I don't remember doing it.)

(Aside to Lonnie -- Cliff Furline and I lived near each other, and would ride the same bus in to get to work at the Great Escape.  I specifically remember getting packs of these at a Stop-N-Go near the bus stop, and trading dupes with him on the way in.  Cliff recognized that the artwork was by Alex Nino, a Filipino comics artist who was doing horror comics for DC at the time.)
lcummins

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 303
Reply with quote  #6 
Quote:
Originally Posted by wdmullins
...(Aside to Lonnie -- Cliff Furline and I lived near each other, and would ride the same bus in to get to work at the Great Escape.  I specifically remember getting packs of these at a Stop-N-Go near the bus stop, and trading dupes with him on the way in.  Cliff recognized that the artwork was by Alex Nino, a Filipino comics artist who was doing horror comics for DC at the time.)


Man, I haven’t thought about Cliff in years! How is he doing? I sold most of my comic collection to the Great Escape in the early 90’s, but I was still collecting non-sports and kept all those. I wonder if Gary is still alive? He was already getting up there in the 80’s.

__________________
Lonnie Cummins
egbeachley

Member
Registered:
Posts: 87
Reply with quote  #7 
1975 is modern since that’s when mass production really took off
egbeachley

Member
Registered:
Posts: 87
Reply with quote  #8 
Wait, how could someone start the Golden Age with the 1930s? Completely misses the classics of the N and T cards
non-sports daniel

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 386
Reply with quote  #9 
It’s a gum card thing.
lcummins

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 303
Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by non-sports daniel
It’s a gum card thing.


Exactly! 🤪

__________________
Lonnie Cummins
forbesrs

Avatar / Picture

Member
Registered:
Posts: 75
Reply with quote  #11 

Golden Era: When tobacco cards, silks, flannel, leathers, etc. were being issued.

Modern - anything after the 1910's when they stopped issuing American tobacco cards (for the most part)

Guess it all depends on your perspective...

Bob

jdm43

Member
Registered:
Posts: 13
Reply with quote  #12 
I still use pre and post war for everything after the tobacco era and 1980 is a pretty good cut-off for the next period to start. However, I wonder if we should lump everything after 1980 together as "Modern". 

To my thinking a new era started around 2000 when most non-roll playing cards disappeared from the candy, convenience, and drug stores. For the first time since the 1920's the target market ceased to be kids from 5 to 12 years old. Very few kids can afford $17 packs with sets featuring more chase cards than base set.

Most of us started collecting a pack at a time from a neighborhood store. Where will the next generation of collectors come from without this intro into our world. 

Jim Miller
toppcat

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 226
Reply with quote  #13 
I have always considered modern starting in 1981, when Topps lost the BB Card monopoly.  Baseball Cards magazine debuted early that year and the hobby hit the mainstream then.
__________________
Dave Hornish

Visit my vintage Topps blog at: 
http://toppsarchives.blogspot.com/ Free Download of The Modern Hobby Guide to Topps Chewing Gum or softcover ordering details are here: http://themodernhobbyguide.blogspot.com/
bvb5366

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 158
Reply with quote  #14 

Tobacco cards were invented to get adults to buy a specific brand of tobacco products over any other. These cards belong in a different category than the post tobacco cards. I would call the tobacco card era the prehistoric age. I agree with Jim Miller that the modern age for card collecting started around 1910 or basically when card collecting went away from targeting adult smokers and started to go after the young and the young at heart. 

Sports cards bridged the gap between the Tobacco era and the modern era. In fact, I think that the popularity of sports tobacco cards, with the kids, is the reason the modern era actually began. What we can call the modern era lasted into the 90's when the post-modern era, or as I prefer to think of it as the "garbage era" began. I first recognized this new era when I was at a card show and I watched a couple of kids opening boxes of baseball cards while standing by a trash can. They opened their packs, took out a card or two and threw the rest into the trash. They were looking for the important cards, the chase cards, and really did not care about the "base" set of cards.

That attitude quickly worked its way into the non-sports. If you take a look at the Beckett version of the NSU the price guide is basically a price list of the "special" cards. Hardly anyone cares about the "base sets."  You can pick them up at Allentown for $5 each,5 for $20. So, you can divide up the 90 years of the modern era anyway you want. I personally think most of those years produced gold. Hanging around with this board has introduced me and given me an appreciation for the early days of the modern era. Hey, I am even developing an appreciation of the tobacco era because of your bad influence on me. I never would  have expected myself to buy 1887 N171 Goodwin Actress tobacco card display advertising signs but i did. Just saying.

__________________
Joe Marciano
carbking

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 175
Reply with quote  #15 
Semantics are always a slippery slope!

First, last, best, worst, vintage, classic, modern, etc.

You should read some of the cyberarguments on the automobile forums about who was first [wink]

Personally, if it isn't a automobile card, and indian card, a stamp card, or cut off the back of a box of some kind.................I don't care! [wink]

Would rather just use a date range, without the nomenclature.

Jon.

__________________
Jon Hardgrove

If you think "one size fits all" - try walking a mile in your spouse's shoes!
MorrellMan

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #16 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvb5366

 I first recognized this new era when I was at a card show and I watched a couple of kids opening boxes of baseball cards while standing by a trash can. They opened their packs, took out a card or two and threw the rest into the trash. They were looking for the important cards, the chase cards, and really did not care about the "base" set of cards.



That was me in 1960.  I bought the packs at my local drug store, went out back beside the dumpster, opened the packs, took out the ones I needed and tossed the rest.  I still remember the heartbeat surge when I came across a new card.  I knew my cards well enough to know which ones I needed and which ones I didn't need. Nothing new about what those kids were doing, IMHO.

__________________
Mark Hellman
bvb5366

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 158
Reply with quote  #17 
Mark:
      You missed the point entirely. When I was a kid opening packs we took what we needed for our collection. We were trying to get a set of our cards. In the 50's dupes went into flipping cards with the other guys. Some went into the spokes of my younger sister's bike because they made a cool sound. As I got older I was still buying packs but the dupes went to my younger brothers- whether I wanted them to have them or not. When I went into the AF I left a box with the extras for the sets I had made over the years. I had made Mars Attacks, Planes, TV Westerns, Zorro, Isolation Both, Space Cards, etc. They were gone when I came back but what the heck, who needed 50 or 60 Mars Attacks dupe cards, after all, I had hidden the sets successfully. However, at no time did we ever toss our dupes into the trash.
      
    The point I was making was that they threw all the base cards into the trash. They were not worrying about making the card set. They were looking for the "money cards"- what we called the chase cards. It was similar to buying scratch-offs to see if you have won money. Kids and grownups too became gamblers and speculators. The card collectors had left the building. 

    I am sorry that in 1960 you did not have anyone to share your collecting with. In the Golden part of the Modern Era, as I see it for whatever that is worth, trading, flipping cards and sharing our collecting with our friends was a big part of the fun. When that was gone, so was the Golden part of the hobby.

__________________
Joe Marciano
wdmullins

Member
Registered:
Posts: 53
Reply with quote  #18 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lcummins


Man, I haven’t thought about Cliff in years! How is he doing? I sold most of my comic collection to the Great Escape in the early 90’s, but I was still collecting non-sports and kept all those. I wonder if Gary is still alive? He was already getting up there in the 80’s.


Lonnie -- If I had your email address, I've lost it.  So I sent a response to the above to you using CardTalk's internal email (figuring it is off-topic to the rest of the thread).  Just checking if you received it -- I don't see a way to check the status (if it is "read" or "unread") like I can on other boards.
wdmullins

Member
Registered:
Posts: 53
Reply with quote  #19 
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbking

Personally, if it isn't a automobile card, and indian card, a stamp card, or cut off the back of a box of some kind.................I don't care!


Dang -- I just threw away a card I cut off a cereal box.  It had Geronimo driving a Corvette to the post office to buy some First Day of Issue stamps.  I figured no one would want it . .  .
carbking

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 175
Reply with quote  #20 
Wow - shows imagination! [wink]

But it was a "Little Debbie" Famous American card, of Geronimo riding a Mustang to the trading post to buy matches and blankets. The matches to start the fire and the blankets to cover the fire to send smoke signals. 

I would rather it was one of Sitting Bull.

Jon.

__________________
Jon Hardgrove

If you think "one size fits all" - try walking a mile in your spouse's shoes!
MorrellMan

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 270
Reply with quote  #21 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bvb5366
Mark:
      You missed the point entirely. When I was a kid opening packs we took what we needed for our collection. We were trying to get a set of our cards. In the 50's dupes went into flipping cards with the other guys. Some went into the spokes of my younger sister's bike because they made a cool sound. As I got older I was still buying packs but the dupes went to my younger brothers- whether I wanted them to have them or not. When I went into the AF I left a box with the extras for the sets I had made over the years. I had made Mars Attacks, Planes, TV Westerns, Zorro, Isolation Both, Space Cards, etc. They were gone when I came back but what the heck, who needed 50 or 60 Mars Attacks dupe cards, after all, I had hidden the sets successfully. However, at no time did we ever toss our dupes into the trash.
      
    The point I was making was that they threw all the base cards into the trash. They were not worrying about making the card set. They were looking for the "money cards"- what we called the chase cards. It was similar to buying scratch-offs to see if you have won money. Kids and grownups too became gamblers and speculators. The card collectors had left the building. 

    I am sorry that in 1960 you did not have anyone to share your collecting with. In the Golden part of the Modern Era, as I see it for whatever that is worth, trading, flipping cards and sharing our collecting with our friends was a big part of the fun. When that was gone, so was the Golden part of the hobby.


Joe - that was a bit harsh.  Did you find something offensive in my share? 

__________________
Mark Hellman
bvb5366

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 158
Reply with quote  #22 
Mark:
      Sorry if I sounded harsh. 

I do think that you missed my point. In my day we were interested in the set of cards. There was nothing extra that we looked for except the gum. In the early 50's when I started collecting picture cards we did not have much money to spend. We would never have thrown away cards. We could use them in trades or give them to a close friend. We did not have much of anything, and so we let nothing go to waste. Of course we beat the heck out of our extra cards in matching games or closest to the wall, but we got as much value as possible out of them. When they got too bad for flipping they would end up in the bicycle spokes. That was all part of the friendships with the other kids. I felt it was too bad if you did not have the pleasure of taking part in that kind of thing. 

But my point still is that, with the advent of chase cards, card collecting changed for the worst. For example, I have a NSU, Feb/March 2020, right at my desk. I opened it at random to the price guide and saw the listing for 2018 Star Wars The Last Jedi Series Two. The listing starts in the last third of column 2, takes all of column 3 and about one quarter of column 4. The base set is mentioned on two lines, one for set price and the other for common card price. Everything else is prices for the "money" cards. This is not the way we used to collect cards. That attitude ushered in the "Garbage Age" of collecting, where the reason to open a pack of cards has become the search for artificially scarce cards. That, I think, is not card collecting. 

Sorry again for sounding harsh. But when I get on my soapbox I tend to preach with vigor.





__________________
Joe Marciano
boxingcardman

Avatar / Picture

Senior Member
Registered:
Posts: 136
Reply with quote  #23 
Quote:
Originally Posted by toppcat
I have always considered modern starting in 1981, when Topps lost the BB Card monopoly.  Baseball Cards magazine debuted early that year and the hobby hit the mainstream then.


Ditto.  1981-89 is modern, 1990-now is shiny crap.  And I say that with love as a collector of many shiny crap issues.  

That said, a lot of stuff from the shiny crap era is on the move, pricewise, because the cohort of kids who grew up on these cards are reaching their peak earning years.

__________________
God is not on our side because He hates idiots
The demagogue is the public face of collective stupidity
How did a life on the wild side ever get so dull?
We can be heroes, just for one day
Judge a man by how he treats someone who can do nothing for him--Nick Charles
http://www.americasgreatboxingcards.com
Previous Topic | Next Topic
Print
Reply

Quick Navigation:

Easily create a Forum Website with Website Toolbox.